Las Vegas, NV | In-person training

Applying for Nonprofit Tax Exempt Status

No need to spend hundreds or even thousands of dollars to have a lawyer fill out the IRS application form. This two-hour workshop will walk you, line-by-line, through the process.

Knowledge base

Can my organization have a subsidiary?

Yes, a nonprofit organization may create a subsidiary with either a for-profit or a nonprofit structure. In some situations creating a subsidiary may make sense. If you think this is something your organization should do, please talk to an attorney familiar with both corporate and nonprofit law to fully understand the tax and legal implications.

Knowledge base

How do I learn about dissolving a private foundation?

Most foundations are set up to have a perpetual life-span, spending out only the interests from their investments while keeping the initial endowment intact. Other foundations choose to have a limited life-span. Regardless of the reason for the termination, foundations dissolve by "spending down" their assets in compliance with both state and federal law.

Knowledge base

How do I learn about dissolving my nonprofit?

There are a few steps you will need to take when dissolving or terminating your 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization, starting with a vote from your board of directors to dissolve the organization. Board members may not be aware of how to dissolve and organization, so the planning may take time. Throughout this process, it is beneficial to have the minimum number of board members required by your bylaws remain on your board to aid the dissolution process.

Knowledge base

How do I start a nonprofit organization?

Starting a nonprofit organization can be an inspiring way to give back to your community and help those in need. However, it is important to understand all of the steps involved in this process before moving forward. 

Video

Low-profit Limited Liability Companies: A For-Profit with a Non-profit Soul

Cass Brewer, a partner at Morris, Manning & Martin, explains the nuts and bolts of the low-profit limited liability company (L3C), which is a cross between a non-profit and a for-profit. It is a new form of business enterprise that is specifically designed to further a socially beneficial mission and, in the right circumstances, can qualify as a program-related investment for foundations.